The Heroin Addict

He said…..

“You think I don’t want to be normal like you?”

And we heard.

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42 thoughts on “The Heroin Addict

  1. I’m a too familiar with people struggling with addiction. I think a lot of them want to get better on some level but they have to really want it to get better and stay that way. Hope that is the case here.

  2. reocochran says:

    I think it is nice when someone compliments me and says I have my “act together,” Colleen.:)

  3. Sad. But very effective. It must make a big difference to be really heard.

  4. Ocean Bream says:

    Sad and cruel and tragic – that people have to go through this. So many circumstances lead to that particular route. It’s sad that lives must be so hard that people need to escape reality. But at the same time, it’s good that there are other amazing people who hear those crying for help.

  5. Paul says:

    Sigh.Addiction is a huge,complex topic that does not lend itself easily to solutions. Like cancer, every addiction is slightly different. I worry for those who struggle and I got a controlled taste of what it meant once – it was scary looking into that world. No matter the screaming and pounding and swearing and thrashing,that impenetrable glass wall stands unmoved and unaffected between the normal and the addicts. The very existence of the wall itself creates a culture of victims, even without all the trappings of addiction. And that just adds to the complexity. And yet for the casual viewer all looks normal because the glass wall cannot be seen, just acts as an impenetrable barrier.

    • Paul, your comment very clearly defines what I saw. And see. That barrier was all around him. And he couldn’t break through it.

      • Paul says:

        Oh indeed, indeed. The trucking world has lots of alcoholics and addicts. Few get through that life style without some impact from addiction – either their own or the effects of others’ on them. That said, my own experience was when I had colon cancer – there was a complication that meant i was fed through a tube in my neck for 6 weeks. No food entered my mouth for 6 weeks. I cannot begin to describe the wrenching tearing feeling that created. I could not even sleep at night as i dreamt of greasy hamburgers and Coke. I couldn’t watch TV because the food commercials drove me nuts. I constantly craved the texture and taste and smell of food. Thankfully I was ambulatory because i had to leave the hospital whenever meal time came . In short it was mind bending – and I got some idea of what an addiction entailed.

        • What a comparison Paul. I’m sorry you went through that. Thank you though, for sharing it. I can’t imagine that feeling. I ‘think’ I can, but in truth know that I have no way of understanding that unless I experience it.

  6. Victo Dolore says:

    Gave me goosebumps.

  7. Janet says:

    And really…what is “normal” anyway? I hear his cry for a better existence, free from the shackles. So much potential being suppressed.

  8. So sad! Sad to be chained by addiction! I’m sure he would love to be normal.

  9. April says:

    He’s probably grateful you listened.

  10. That is all they want – to be accepted and loved. Like everyone else.

  11. lalalo83 says:

    Check out my blog i just started. Username: lalalo83. An addicts odyssey through the land of nod. Im starting to write about my struggle with addiction for half my life

  12. momsdorecover says:

    Great story

  13. Brady's eyes says:

    Stunning!
    As a recovery addict, I can understand and comprehend the gratitude he must have felt simply just for listening.
    Being heard is just the beginning of most addict’s journey though. Recovery is a long winded road, probably one of the hardest journeys anyone can embark on, but also one of the most rewarding

    • I ‘hope’ for the addicts I encounter, and know that I am truly powerless on making that road any easier for them. But I want it, so badly, for them. Continued well wishes for you on your journey!

  14. I’m glad to hear you really listened to that person. Addiction to heroin consumes the lives of its users. The devastating effects it can have are heartbreaking. Overdoses are on the rise and those addicted need support to overcome it now more then ever. Check out my blog “Overdose Reality” under my page “Virtual Ride-Along” to read what an overdose experience is like from a law enforcement perspective. It might give you some more insight on the harsh realities.

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